Press Release Archives - NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress

NYU CENTER FOR URBAN SCIENCE AND PROGRESS PROFESSOR RELEASES WORLD’S DENSEST URBAN AERIAL LASER SCANNING DATASET

New York, NY – New York University’s Center for Urban Science and Progress (NYU CUSP) Professor Debra F. Laefer today released the world’s densest urban aerial laser scanning (LiDAR) dataset. At over 300 points per square meter, this is more than 30 times denser than typical LiDAR data and is an order of magnitude denser than any other aerial LiDAR dataset. The dataset also includes the first ever urban scan with the fullwave form version of the data, as well as affiliated imagery and video. The unprecedented comprehensiveness of this multi-layered dataset enables new opportunities in exploration and modeling. It also sets a new standard for what can be collected and used by cities around the world. The data and affiliated information is now publicly available through New York University’s Spatial Data Repository (SDR) here for both personal and commercial use.

The dataset was collected and processed as part of Professor Laefer’s European Research Council (ERC) $1.7 million research grant “Rethinking Tunneling in Urban Neighborhoods (RETURN)”1 with additional funding from Science Foundation Ireland. Using techniques developed by Professor Laefer’s research team, this dataset provides uniquely high resolution LiDAR data for a 1.5km2 study area of Dublin’s historic city center. The data covers not only the horizontal surfaces of the built environment, as seen in traditional LiDAR projects (e.g. roofs and roads), but also provides dense vertical data including exceptional building facade capture. This allows the creation of richly elaborated 3D models of the urban environment that accurately represent building geometry, curb height, vegetation, and utility lines. The work builds on a previously publicly released dataset (aerial laser scanning and imagery) and more than a decade of research. Permission is currently being sought to acquire similar data for New York City.

Dr. Laefer, Professor of Urban Informatics at NYU CUSP and affiliated with the Tandon School of Engineering’s Department of Civil and Urban Engineering, was the founder and former head of the University College Dublin’s Urban Modeling Group in Dublin, Ireland. There, she led the development of the ERC project’s innovations across the data pipeline from flightpath planning and optimization to final processing for numerical modeling. “A city-scale dataset of this level can be applied to many projects to improve services,” said Laefer. “This extraordinary level of data quality, combined with open access through NYU’s Spatial Data Repository, will help pioneer new possibilities for visualisation and analyses by urban engineers, civic agencies, and entrepreneurs trying to identify and ultimately solve urban challenges of all kinds.”

This dataset can be used in many forms to improve city services such as mobility impaired route assessment, 3D digital tourism, built environment change detection, and comprehensive urban documentation for civic records. The data are also directly applicable for a variety of engineering analyses including building energy modeling, pedestrian wind analysis, disaster planning, and infectious disease tracking.

“NYU Libraries’ accession of aerial laser scanning and photogrammetry data produced by Professor Laefer’s research team is a major addition to our geospatial data holdings,” said Andrew Battista, a professor of Public Service at NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and Librarian for Geospatial Information Systems at New York University. “This collection marks the first time that spatial data associated with a major, grant-funded project has been submitted to our repository. We are confident that this dataset will be invaluable to a larger community of urban studies scholarship, and we anticipate expanding our collections as Prof. Laefer’s research evolves.”

To view a video showing LiDAR data for a portion of central Dublin featured in the dataset, visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEi2Wo7Bcuk

1. https://erc.europa.eu/projects-figures/stories/engineering-safer-cities

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is a university-wide center whose research and education programs are focused on urban informatics. Using NYC as its lab, and building from its home in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, it integrates and applies NYU strengths in the natural, data, and social sciences to understand and improve cities throughout the world. CUSP offers a one-year MS degree in Applied Urban Science & Informatics. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

Follow NYU CUSP on Twitter @NYU_CUSP.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RECOGNIZES 2 NYU PROFESSORS FOR PROMISING RESEARCH IN SMART CITIES AND SMART TRANSPORTATION

Immediate Release

March 26, 2017

 

Joseph Chow and Constantine Kontokosta Receive CAREER Awards to Advance Their Research in Urban Informatics and Smart Transportation

BROOKLYN, New York – The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected two New York University faculty members, Joseph Y.J. Chow and Constantine Kontokosta, as recipients of the prestigious NSF Faculty Early Career Development Awards, more widely known as CAREER Awards. Each will receive a grant to further his research into making cities healthier, safer, and more livable.

Both are assistant professors in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering Department of Civil and Urban Engineering and hold faculty appointments at the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP).

Chow, who is active in NYU’s new research center, Connected Cities for Smart Mobility toward Accessible and Resilient Transportation (C2SMART) and heads the Behavioral Urban Informatics, Transport and Logistics (BUILT) Laboratory, will use the award to study how big data can inform the design of urban transportation systems, with a special emphasis on the privacy issues inherent in gathering and interpreting that data. Chow points out that although the U.S. Department of Transportation proposed spending $4 billion on autonomous vehicles and pledged $40 million to tackle smart cities as a grand challenge, successful operation of these technologies in large-scale, highly congested urban areas remains prone to operational pitfalls and obstacles. For example, how should a service operator best deploy vehicles or inform travelers in real time to optimize service and learning potential while simultaneously acknowledging their privacy? How can private service providers best partner with government to fill the gaps in public transit systems?

In his research, Chow intends to use real data from industry partners in ridesharing and autonomous vehicle systems and to drive innovation and entrepreneurship by defining new functional roles that mix transportation, computer science, and economics.

In addition to his appointment in the NYU Tandon Department of Civil and Urban Engineering, Kontokosta serves as the deputy director for CUSP academics at and heads its Urban Intelligence Lab. Through the CAREER Award, the NSF will support his efforts to develop a data-driven understanding of cities and metropolitan energy dynamics and the impacts on human well-being. Kontokosta has launched the Quantified Community  research initiative, deploying sensors to measure factors such as noise and air quality in lower Manhattan, the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, and at Hudson Yards, a 28-acre, 20 million-square-foot “city-within-a-city” on the west side of Manhattan.

Buildings account for as much as 40 percent of the nation’s energy use and carbon emissions, a figure that rises to 80 percent in dense urban areas like New York City.  Kontokosta’s research in urban informatics and metropolitan energy dynamics aims to create new analytical approaches coupled with big data to advance fundamental understanding of the patterns and determinants of urban energy demand and emissions from the built environment. Building on his interdisciplinary background, Kontokosta will integrate methods from civil and systems engineering, data science, and computational social science to develop models that support decision-making.

“We are gratified that two of our young and upcoming professors have joined the growing list of NYU faculty members who have won CAREER Awards,” said NYU Dean of Engineering Katepalli R. Sreenivasan. “Even this early in their academic careers, the cutting-edge research of Professors Chow and Kontokosta has contributed significantly to our department of Civil and Urban Engineering even as they are contributing research in areas of great importance to New York City and other metropolitan areas around the world. These awards from the NSF will help them improve the lives of countless residents and commuters.”

“At CUSP, the research being done by both Constantine Kontokosta and Joseph Chow has been instrumental in defining the science of cities,” said CUSP Director Steven Koonin.  “Through their CAREER Awards, Professors Kontokosta and Chow’s work will contribute practical solutions to growing cities.”

“We are delighted that both Joe and Constantine have both received one of NSF’s sought-after CAREER grants,” said Magued Iskander, chair of the NYU Tandon Civil and Urban Engineering Department.  “This prestigious recognition of our faculty, along with the recent award of a transportation research center, exemplifies our department’s growing research and teaching strengths.”

The CAREER Program is highly competitive and supports junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research.

 

About the New York University Tandon School of Engineering

The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, the founding date for both the New York University School of Civil Engineering and Architecture and the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly). A January 2014 merger created a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention and entrepreneurship and dedicated to furthering technology in service to society. In addition to its main location in Brooklyn, NYU Tandon collaborates with other schools within NYU, the country’s largest private research university, and is closely connected to engineering programs at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai. It operates Future Labs focused on start-up businesses in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn and an award-winning online graduate program. For more information, visit http://engineering.nyu.edu.

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is a university-wide center whose research and education programs are focused on urban informatics. Using NYC as its lab, and building from its home in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, it integrates and applies NYU strengths in the natural, data, and social sciences to understand and improve cities throughout the world. CUSP offers a one-year MS degree in Applied Urban Science & Informatics. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu.

 

 

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Media Contacts:

Kathleen Hamilton, NYU Tandon                                                     Kim Alfred, CUSP

646.997.3792 / mobile 347.843.9782                                               646.997.0508 / mobile 917.392.0859

kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu                                                              kim.alfred@nyu.edu

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RECOGNIZES 2 NYU PROFESSORS FOR PROMISING RESEARCH IN SMART CITIES AND SMART TRANSPORTATION

Immediate Release

March 16, 2017

Joseph Chow and Constantine Kontokosta Receive CAREER Awards to Advance Their Research in Urban Informatics and Smart Transportation

BROOKLYN, New York – The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected two New York University faculty members, Joseph Y.J. Chow and Constantine Kontokosta, as recipients of the prestigious NSF Faculty Early Career Development Awards, more widely known as CAREER Awards. Each will receive a grant to further his research into making cities healthier, safer, and more livable.

Both are assistant professors in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering Department of Civil and Urban Engineering and hold faculty appointments at the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP).

Chow, who is active in NYU’s new research center, Connected Cities for Smart Mobility toward Accessible and Resilient Transportation (C2SMART) and heads the Behavioral Urban Informatics, Transport and Logistics (BUILT) Laboratory, will use the award to study how big data can inform the design of urban transportation systems, with a special emphasis on the privacy issues inherent in gathering and interpreting that data. Chow points out that although the U.S. Department of Transportation proposed spending $4 billion on autonomous vehicles and pledged $40 million to tackle smart cities as a grand challenge, successful operation of these technologies in large-scale, highly congested urban areas remains prone to operational pitfalls and obstacles. For example, how should a service operator best deploy vehicles or inform travelers in real time to optimize service and learning potential while simultaneously acknowledging their privacy? How can private service providers best partner with government to fill the gaps in public transit systems?

In his research, Chow intends to use real data from industry partners in ridesharing and autonomous vehicle systems and to drive innovation and entrepreneurship by defining new functional roles that mix transportation, computer science, and economics.

In addition to his appointment in the NYU Tandon Department of Civil and Urban Engineering, Kontokosta serves as the deputy director for CUSP academics at and heads its Urban Intelligence Lab. Through the CAREER Award, the NSF will support his efforts to develop a data-driven understanding of cities and metropolitan energy dynamics and the impacts on human well-being. Kontokosta has launched the Quantified Community  research initiative, deploying sensors to measure factors such as noise and air quality in lower Manhattan, the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, and at Hudson Yards, a 28-acre, 20 million-square-foot “city-within-a-city” on the west side of Manhattan.

Buildings account for as much as 40 percent of the nation’s energy use and carbon emissions, a figure that rises to 80 percent in dense urban areas like New York City.  Kontokosta’s research in urban informatics and metropolitan energy dynamics aims to create new analytical approaches coupled with big data to advance fundamental understanding of the patterns and determinants of urban energy demand and emissions from the built environment. Building on his interdisciplinary background, Kontokosta will integrate methods from civil and systems engineering, data science, and computational social science to develop models that support decision-making.

“We are gratified that two of our young and upcoming professors have joined the growing list of NYU faculty members who have won CAREER Awards,” said NYU Dean of Engineering Katepalli R. Sreenivasan. “Even this early in their academic careers, the cutting-edge research of Professors Chow and Kontokosta has contributed significantly to our department of Civil and Urban Engineering even as they are contributing research in areas of great importance to New York City and other metropolitan areas around the world. These awards from the NSF will help them improve the lives of countless residents and commuters.”

“At CUSP, the research being done by both Constantine Kontokosta and Joseph Chow has been instrumental in defining the science of cities,” said CUSP Director Steven Koonin.  “Through their CAREER Awards, Professors Kontokosta and Chow’s work will contribute practical solutions to growing cities.”

“We are delighted that both Joe and Constantine have both received one of NSF’s sought-after CAREER grants,” said Magued Iskander, chair of the NYU Tandon Civil and Urban Engineering Department.  “This prestigious recognition of our faculty, along with the recent award of a transportation research center, exemplifies our department’s growing research and teaching strengths.”

The CAREER Program is highly competitive and supports junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research.

 

About the New York University Tandon School of Engineering

The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, the founding date for both the New York University School of Civil Engineering and Architecture and the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly). A January 2014 merger created a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention and entrepreneurship and dedicated to furthering technology in service to society. In addition to its main location in Brooklyn, NYU Tandon collaborates with other schools within NYU, the country’s largest private research university, and is closely connected to engineering programs at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai. It operates Future Labs focused on start-up businesses in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn and an award-winning online graduate program. For more information, visit http://engineering.nyu.edu.

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is a university-wide center whose research and education programs are focused on urban informatics. Using NYC as its lab, and building from its home in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, it integrates and applies NYU strengths in the natural, data, and social sciences to understand and improve cities throughout the world. CUSP offers a one-year MS degree in Applied Urban Science & Informatics. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu.

 

 

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Media Contacts:

Kathleen Hamilton, NYU Tandon                                                     Kim Alfred, CUSP

646.997.3792 / mobile 347.843.9782                                               646.997.0508 / mobile 917.392.0859

kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu                                                              kim.alfred@nyu.edu

FUTURE CITIES CATAPULT AND NYU’S CENTER FOR URBAN SCIENCE & PROGRESS JOIN FORCES TO MEASURE THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SMART CITIES

New York, NY – Future Cities Catapult, the London-based center of excellence on urban innovation, has teamed up with one of the world’s leading data analytics units – the New York University Centre for Science & Urban Progress (NYU CUSP) – to create a novel framework to measure the economic and social impact of smart urban solutions, technology and infrastructure deployments.

This major piece of work will be carried out over the next 12 months by the Future Cities Catapult Digital Strategy and Economics team and NYU CUSP’s team of researchers led by Dr. Stanislav Sobolevsky and Dr. Constantine Kontokosta.

“CUSP has been instrumental in bringing a rigorous evidence based approach to this cutting edge project,” said Meagan Crawford, Lead Economist at Future Cities Catapult. “Future Cities Catapult will combine the world-leading expertise of Henry Overman from the What Works Centre and other notable academics over the next 12 months by testing and validating the economic performance of digital solutions across global cities”.

“At present, cities face enormous challenges when they try to assess the costs and benefits of smart city initiatives,” said Jarmo Eskselinen, Chief Innovation and Technology Office, Future Cities Catapult. “The complexities and interdependencies of city systems combined with a lack of evidence of impact mean that cities are not always able to justify major smart city investment. By working together, Future Cities Catapult’s economics experts and NYU CUSP’s data analytics experts can create the capacity to deliver a world-leading programme on urban impact measurement.”

“This collaborative project with Future Cities Catapult will allow us to significantly advance the field of urban data analytics and network science methodology,” said Dr. Sobolevsky. “This research will generate demonstrable real-world impact and use cases that can increase efficiencies in our cities as they respond to the challenges of rapid urbanization.”

“Cities are increasingly looking to technology to help them solve some of their most pressing challenges,” said Dr. Kontokosta, Assistant Professor of Urban Informatics at CUSP and the Tandon School of Engineering, “Our work with the Future Cities Catapult will provide city leaders with a robust, objective understanding of the economic, social, and environmental impacts of a range innovative approaches to improving urban infrastructure and quality-of-life in cities”.

NOTES TO EDITORS
For further information contact Naomi Moore on nmoore@futurecities.catapult.org.uk / 07718 584331

About Future Cities Catapult (Futurecities.catapult.org.uk)
Future Cities Catapult exists to advance innovation, to grow UK companies, to make cities better. We bring together businesses, universities and city leaders so that they can work with each other to solve the problems that cities face, now and in the future. This means that we catalyse and apply innovations to grow UK business and promote UK exports.

From our Urban Innovation Centre in London, we provide world-class facilities and expertise to support the development of new products and services, as well as opportunities to collaborate with others, test ideas and develop business models.

We help innovators turn ingenious ideas into working prototypes that can be tested in real urban settings. Then, once they’re proven, we help spread them to cities across the world to improve quality of life, strengthen economies and protect the environment.

Follow us on Twitter @futurecitiescat or sign up for our newsletter to keep up to date with our news.

About Catapult centres
The Catapult centres are a network of world-leading centres designed to transform the UK’s capability for innovation in specific areas and help drive future economic growth. The Catapults network has been established by Innovate UK. For more information visit catapult.org.uk.

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is a university-wide center whose research and education programs are focused on urban informatics. Using NYC as its lab, and building from its home in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, it integrates and applies NYU strengths in the natural, data, and social sciences to understand and improve cities throughout the world. CUSP offers a one-year MS degree in Applied Urban Science & Informatics. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

Follow NYU CUSP on Twitter @NYU_CUSP.

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CONTACT:

Kim Alfred, CUSP

917.392.0859 / kim.alfred@nyu.edu

Patrice Kugler

212.402.3486 / pkugler@marinopr.com

 

NYU CENTER FOR URBAN SCIENCE & PROGRESS AWARDED JOHN D. AND CATHERINE T. MacARTHUR FOUNDATION GRANT TO ESTABLISH CIVIC ANALYTICS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

 

New York, NY – New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress (CUSP) announced today that Professor Constantine Kontokosta, who also serves as Deputy Director for Academics, has received a $250,000 grant award from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The grant will fund a new pilot program to award three postgraduate fellowships to work on high-impact, high-priority urban analytics projects.

Today’s urban data sources provide a vast amount of information, giving policy makers the chance to identify areas of improvement in a city’s operations and services. However, translating data into insights takes personnel with specific training and deep expertise. Working alongside city experts, CUSP’s new fellowship program aims to address this challenge, delivering value to city agencies by creating a dedicated urban data science team to focus on city-identified problems and work toward measurable solutions.

“The Civic Analytics Fellowship program will deliver impact for the city agencies with which we work, help to establish a field-tested talent pipeline for urban science and informatics, and demonstrate how data can be used to support operational and policy decisions in city government.” said Kontokosta. “We hope that this program will serve as a model of collaborative engagement between universities and city agencies for data analytics projects that could be adapted to other cities.”

The Civic Analytics Postgraduate Fellowship Program builds on the structure and experience of CUSP’s existing Urban Science Intensive Capstone Program. Currently, small teams of students have the opportunity to work directly with city agencies to use analytics to tackle a range of urban challenges as part of the CUSP MS in Applied Urban Science and Informatics program. The new fellowship program will allow recent MS and PhD graduates to expand that work, providing continuity for ongoing city collaborations and giving the fellows real-world training, experience and opportunities for structured professional development in the emerging field of urban informatics.

“The Civic Analytics Fellowship Program is the type of collaboration between cities and universities that is critical as we find solutions to complex urban challenges,” said Ben Levine, Interim Director, MetroLab Network. “These types of programs will enhance our understanding of urban science while supporting cities’ efforts to improve the quality of life for their residents.” -more-

“Our ongoing collaborations with NYU CUSP help bolster the talent we need to expand the impact of data analytics in City government,” said Amen Ra Mashariki, Chief Analytics Office for the City of New York. “The Civic Analytics Fellowship program is another important mechanism to demonstrate the value of analytics and data-driven approaches to public-sector operational and policy decisions.”

Applications are currently being accepted for the nine-month fellowship positions. Click here for additional information.

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress

CUSP is a university-wide center whose research and education programs are focused on urban informatics. Using NYC as its lab, and building from its home in the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, it integrates and applies NYU strengths in the natural, data, and social sciences to understand and improve cities throughout the world. CUSP offers a one-year MS degree in Applied Urban Science & Informatics. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

 

About the MacArthur Foundation

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation supports creative people, effective institutions, and influential networks building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. MacArthur is placing a few big bets that truly significant progress is possible on some of the world’s most pressing social challenges, including over-incarceration, global climate change, nuclear risk, and significantly increasing capital for the social sector. In addition to the MacArthur Fellows Program, the Foundation continues its historic commitments to the role of journalism in a responsible and responsive democracy; the strength and vitality of our headquarters city, Chicago; and generating new knowledge about critical issues.

 

 

Contact:

Kim Alfred, CUSP

917.392.0859

kim.alfred@nyu.edu

 

Patrice Kugler, Marino

212.402.3486

pkugler@marinopr.com

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NYU CENTER FOR URBAN SCIENCE & PROGRESS RESEARCHER AMONG 21ST CENTURY SCIENCE INITIATIVE AWARD WINNERS

 

New York, NY – New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress (CUSP) researcher Gregory Dobler is one of the recipients of the 21st Century Science Initiative Awards. Funded by the James S. McDonnell Foundation, the award will provide funding for Dobler’s project, entitled ‘Understanding the Complex Urban System through Remote Imaging’.

The James S. McDonnell Foundation recently announced more than $14 million in grants for the 21st Century Science Initiative Awards, funding research in three program areas: Understanding Human Cognition, Mathematical & Complex Systems Approaches to Brain Cancer, and Studying Complex Systems. Dobler’s study, which was the recipient of a Scholar Award for the Study of Complex Systems, will receive $450,000 over the course of three years.

“My background in astrophysics led me to ponder whether the same techniques from fields like Astronomy and Computer Vision could be used to study the city as a complex system,” said Dobler. “Much like astrophysicists try to understand the Universe by taking pictures of it from a distance, the idea of understanding the urban environment by taking pictures of it from a distance has opened up a host of possibilities for the science of cities: from unique air quality monitoring to the quantification of energy efficiency to the interaction of people with the technology used in the built infrastructure.”

“My background in astrophysics led me to ponder whether the same techniques from fields like Astronomy and Computer Vision could be used to study the city as a complex system,” said Dobler. “Much like astrophysicists try to understand the Universe by taking pictures of it from a distance, the idea of understanding the urban environment by taking pictures of it from a distance has opened up a host of possibilities for the science of cities: from unique air quality monitoring to the quantification of energy efficiency to the interaction of people with the technology used in the built infrastructure.”

Dobler is an Associate Director for Physical Sciences at CUSP and a Research Assistant Professor of Physics at NYU. He specializes in image analysis, computer vision, time series, statistical analysis, and mathematical modeling of large data sets. Prior to joining CUSP, Greg was an astrophysicist specializing in multi-wavelength, full sky data sets from radio to gamma-ray energies, and led the discovery of one of the largest structures in the Milky Way.

“I am extremely honored to receive this award from the James S. McDonnell Foundation and excited about the avenues of research that it makes possible. With this award, we will be able to acquire state-of-the-art instrumentation for imaging New York from a distance and use the resultant data sets to generate unprecedented views of the city skyline. This data will be crucial to studying the interactions between the human, built, and natural environments of the city, resulting in a unique approach to the study of the city as a complex system,” said Dobler.

Founded in 1950 by the late aerospace pioneer and founder of what would become the McDonnell Douglas Corporation, James S. McDonnell believed that science and technology gives mankind the power to shape knowledge for the future while improving our lives. “Mr. Mac’s” vision continues to be realized through the research these grants are supporting. Since the inception of the program in 2000, more than $264 million in funding has been awarded.

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is an applied science research institute created by New York University with a consortium of world-class universities and the foremost international technology companies to address the needs of cities. At the heart of its academic program, CUSP will investigate and develop solutions to the challenges that face cities around the world. This research will make CUSP the world’s leading authority in the emerging field of “urban informatics”. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

###

Contact:

Kim Alfred, CUSP

917.392.0859

kim.alfred@nyu.edu

 

Elizabeth Latino, The Marino Organization

212.402.3488

elizabeth@themarino.org

NYU CENTER FOR URBAN SCIENCE & PROGRESS RESEARCHER AMONG KNIGHT NEWS CHALLENGE WINNERS

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 27, 2016

New York, NY – New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress (CUSP) research scientist Ravi Shroff is a member of one of the winning projects of the prestigious John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s Knight News Challenge. The proposal is one of 17 winning projects of the Knight News Challenge on Data announced yesterday at an event at Civic Hall in New York.

The Knight News Challenge on Data funds breakthrough ideas that make data work for individuals and communities. This year’s challenge called upon entrants to answer the following question: “How might we make data work for individuals and communities?” Led by Sharad Goel, Shroff and his colleagues submitted a proposal called “Law, Order & Algorithms: Making Sense of 100 Million Highway Patrol Stops,” aiming to bring greater transparency, accountability and equity to police interactions with the public during highway stops.

“Traffic stops represent one of the most common ways citizens interact with law enforcement. Accordingly, our intent in compiling, cleaning, analyzing, and releasing this large, geographically comprehensive dataset of police stops is to enable policymakers, law enforcement officials, and the public to work together to improve our criminal justice system in a rigorous, evidence-based manner,” said Shroff.

The project team put together a plan to collect, clean, release, and analyze more than 100 million highway patrol stops throughout the U.S. spanning the last several years, ultimately creating one of the most comprehensive national datasets of police interactions with the public. By creating and releasing such a comprehensive study, a vast collection of empirical data on police behavior would be available for local law enforcement agencies, researchers, public officials, journalists and community advocacy groups to use.

“The project reveals the power of data to unlock useful information and increase people’s understanding of everyday issues that affect their lives,” said John Bracken, Knight Foundation vice president for media innovation.

The project lead is Sharad Goel, an assistant professor at Stanford in the Department of Management Science & Engineering. Team members included Ravi Shroff, a research scientist at NYU CUSP, Vignesh Ramachandran of Stanford Computational Journalism Lab, and Camelia Simoiu and Sam Corbett-Davies of Stanford’s School of Engineering.

Knight Foundation is the leading funder of journalism and media innovation in the nation, seeking the next generation of innovations that will inform and engage communities. Knight’s mission is to promote informed and engaged communities. The foundation does that by investing in innovations in media and journalism, community engagement and the arts.

To learn more about the Knight News Challenge, visit www.newschallenge.org.

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is an applied science research institute created by New York University with a consortium of world-class universities and the foremost international technology companies to address the needs of cities. At the heart of its academic program, CUSP will investigate and develop solutions to the challenges that face cities around the world. This research will make CUSP the world’s leading authority in the emerging field of “urban informatics”. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu.

 

About Knight Foundation
Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. The foundation believes that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged. For more, visit knightfoundation.org.

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CONTACT:

Kim Alfred, CUSP

917.392.0859

kim.alfred@nyu.edu

Elizabeth Latino, The Marino Organization

212.889.0808

elizabeth@themarino.org

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PARTNERS WITH KING’S COLLEGE AND THE UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK TO ESTABLISH THE CENTER FOR URBAN SCIENCE AND PROGRESS IN LONDON

New York University (NYU), King’s College London, and the University of Warwick have signed an agreement to establish a London Center for Urban Science and Progress at Bush House, part of King’s Strand campus, in 2017.

London will be the first city to build upon the success of CUSP in New York City, which was launched in April 2012 by Mayor Bloomberg and of which Warwick is an academic partner. In developing CUSP London, the partners will benefit from the experience in New York City, where CUSP is now established as a leader in the new field of urban science and informatics.

CUSP London will bring together researchers, businesses, local authorities and government agencies to apply urban science to improving public health and wellbeing. It will draw on the real experience and ‘big data’ available in cities, thereby using the cities themselves as living laboratories to tackle their most significant issues. CUSP London will complement the MedCity initiative which the GLA recently launched with King’s and other academic partners, and the Mayor of London’s Smart London plan.

Experts at CUSP London will use data to develop deeper understanding and practical solutions to a wide range of challenges affecting people’s everyday lives. The international partnership will also train a new generation of postgraduate and PhD level urban scientists with the skills and knowledge to benefit London and other major UK and global cities.

The partners will shortly be advertising the post of Director of CUSP London.

Professor Edward Byrne AC, President and Principal of King’s, commented: “We are delighted to have signed an agreement with NYU and Warwick to take forward this exciting initiative and to host the second Center for Urban Science and Progress at our campus in central London. All three university partners share a desire to tackle the increasingly complex challenges facing more major global cities and CUSP London will help us to achieve this.”

Professor Nigel Thrift, Vice-Chancellor of Warwick added: “I welcome the launch of CUSP London, both as a researcher of the dynamics of cities, and as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Warwick which is a partner both in the CUSP London initiative and the original CUSP in New York. CUSP London will be a significant engine of applied urban science research, innovation and education that will work with London as a living laboratory applying research to the needs of our capital and to other great cities.”

Steve Koonin, Director of New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress, said: “We are delighted to welcome London to the CUSP family. We are honored by their strong support of our work and the steps taken to build on our successes in New York City. Our New York team stands ready to work with Kings College and the University of Warwick as the CUSP model is expanded abroad.”

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress
CUSP is an applied science research institute created by New York University with a consortium of world-class universities and the foremost international technology companies to address the needs of cities. At the heart of its academic program, CUSP will investigate and develop solutions to the challenges that face cities around the world. This research will make CUSP the world’s leading authority in the emerging field of “urban informatics”. For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

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Kim Alfred, CUSP
917.392.0859
kim.alfred@nyu.edu

 

Elizabeth Latino, The Marino Organization
212.889.0808
elizabeth@themarino.org

NYU CUSP PARTICIPATES IN THE WHITE HOUSE SMART CITIES FORUM

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy brought government and research professionals together to discuss technical solutions for cities across the country

New York, NY – On Monday, August, 14th, New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress (CUSP) participated in the Smart Cities Forum hosted by The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Joining representatives from city government, the research community, and universities across the country, NYU CUSP took part a discussion to address problems and create solutions for operations, planning, and development.

The Smart Cities Forum, held at the White House South Court Auditorium, comes on the heels of the creation of the “Metro Lab Network,” a collection of universities and city government partnerships working toward technical solutions to challenges such as infrastructure, transportation, and distribution of services. Members of the Network will work together to develop shared, scalable solutions that can be deployed in cities across the country.

The forum was attended by representatives from more than 22 cities and universities across the U.S. including Dr. Steven E. Koonin, the founding director of NYU CUSP. “Now, more than ever, cities are supporting rapidly increasing populations,” says Koonin. “The Metro Lab Network presents an opportunity for us to learn from our shared experiences, city to city.”

NYU CUSP’s core mission and relationship with New York City made it a natural candidate for the Metro Lab Network. Using New York City as its laboratory and classroom, CUSP has set out to respond to the City’s challenge by setting the research agenda for ‘the science of cities,’ and educating the next generation of urban scientists in how to apply this research to real-world problems, bring innovative ideas to cities across the world, and create a new, fast-growing and indispensable industry. NYU CUSP is also working with the New York City Mayor’s Office to create a series of neighborhood innovation labs across the five boroughs, building on the work of the CUSP Quantified Community research facility led by Prof. Constantine Kontokosta. The Metro Lab Network will connect NYU CUSP and New York City to other city/university partnerships, ultimately providing a place for city governments and researchers to share ideas and challenges, collaborate on solutions, and learn best practices from one another.

 

In the coming months, the White House OSTP will announce forthcoming programs that result from the Metro Lab Network.

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress

CUSP is an applied science research institute created by New York University with a consortium of world-class universities and the foremost international technology companies to address the needs of cities. At the heart of its academic program, CUSP will investigate and develop solutions to the challenges that face cities around the world.  This research will make CUSP the world’s leading authority in the emerging field of “urban informatics”.  For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

 

###

Kim Alfred, CUSP

917.392.0859

kim.alfred@nyu.edu

 

Elizabeth Latino, The Marino Organization

212.889.0808

elizabeth@themarino.org

NYU CUSP AND NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES PARTNER ON DATA ANALYTICS AND CITY SERVICES SUMMIT

New York, NY – New York University’s Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) teamed up with the National League of Cities to host the Data Analytics and City Services Summit. Held August 6-7 in New York City, this first-of-its-kind event brought together thought leaders with chief data officers and performance management staff from 12 cities across the nation to accelerate city data analytics efforts and develop methods to improve decision-making and operational efficiency.

“Twelve cities came together to share ideas, best practices and lessons learnt on using data and analytics to improve cities,” said Tom Schenk, chief data officer for the City of Chicago. “When we share these ideas, we can be sure to implement the best ideas at the lowest cost. It is important that the nascent chief data officers, directors of analytics, performance managers and others who are leading the charge for data-driven decisions come together as a community.”

Through a hands-on data analytics workshop and a series of roundtable discussions, participants identified common data-related functions, goals and challenges. Participants then showcased various data approaches and strategies to improve city services and civic engagement.

“Our belief is that a well articulated data strategy that can be applied in multiple cities will accelerate the adoption of effective applications of data analytics,” said Steven Koonin, the founding director of NYU CUSP. “We know that urban science is still very much a nascent field, and we are engaging cities most committed to harnessing data and learning together.”

The attendees also worked with urban informatics students from NYU CUSP to apply new analytical techniques to existing datasets to understand challenges and develop new solutions to deliver city services. Participating cities provided raw data sets prior to the summit, along with information on how the data was collected.

“Local governments are embracing data and technology to solve their most difficult problems and ensure competitive and equitable cities,” said National League of Cities CEO Clarence E. Anthony. “We are proud to support the critical work in cities to apply the innovative solutions that are solving ongoing challenges in local government.”

The summit was lead by renowned experts in the field of urban science, including Steven Goldsmith, Director of the Innovations in American Government Program at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, Sir Peter Elias, Deputy Chair of the Administrative Data Research Board of the UK Statistics Authority, and Stacey Warady Gillett, leader of the What Works Cities initiative at Bloomberg Philanthropies. Participating cities included Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Kansas City, Mo., Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and San Francisco.

NYU CUSP and NLC also conducted a survey of participating cities on their data practices and barriers. The survey found that outdated systems and infrastructure, as well as a lack of resources, were most commonly cited as barriers to leveraging data to improve services and efficiency.

The two-day summit was supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, one of the nation’s largest independent foundations, committed to fostering the development of knowledge, strengthening institutions and improving public policy.

 

About New York University’s Center for Urban Science & Progress

CUSP is an applied science research institute created by New York University with a consortium of world-class universities and the foremost international technology companies to address the needs of cities. At the heart of its academic program, CUSP will investigate and develop solutions to the challenges that face cities around the world.  This research will make CUSP the world’s leading authority in the emerging field of “urban informatics”.  For more news and information on CUSP, please visit http://cusp.nyu.edu/.

 

About the National League of Cities

The National League of Cities (NLC) is dedicated to helping city leaders build better communities. NLC is a resource and advocate for 19,000 cities, towns and villages, representing more than 218 million Americans. www.nlc.org.

 

 

Contact:

Kim Alfred, CUSP

917.392.0859

kim.alfred@nyu.edu

 

Tom Martin, National League of Cities

202.626.3186

martin@nlc.org

 

Elizabeth Latino, The Marino Organization

212.889.0808

elizabeth@themarino.org