Energy & Utilities Archives - NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress

Constantine Kontokosta Is On The Frontlines Of Using Data For Good In Cities

Constantine Kontokosta — Assistant Professor in Tandon’s Department of Civil and Urban Engineering and the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP), the Director of the Urban Intelligence Lab, and the Deputy Director for Academics at CUSP — is using data analytics to advance the fundamental understanding of how cities work and how data-driven decision-making can improve city operations, policy, and planning.

Building on his recent National Science Foundation CAREER award and grants from the MacArthur Foundation and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, he’s making a difference in New York City … and beyond.

Mayor Announces Dramatic Drop in Energy Use and Carbon Emissions in Large Buildings Citywide

Fifth benchmarking report shows that between 2010 and 2015, emissions from 4,200 consistently benchmarked properties dropped by 14 percent, energy use decreased 10 percent

NEW YORK––As part of Mayor de Blasio’s ambitious goals to create more energy efficient buildings and align the city’s emissions reduction goals with the Paris Climate Agreement, the Mayor in partnership with Urban Green Council and NYU’s Center for Urban Science and Progress released New York City’s Energy and Water Use 2014 & 2015 Report, a comprehensive analysis of energy and water usage of large buildings in New York City.

The analysis in the report finds that between 2010 and 2015 greenhouse gas emissions from 4,200 regularly benchmarked properties that missed no more than one benchmarking period, dropped by 14 percent, while energy use decreased 10 percent.

“This new analysis demonstrates that we can continue to achieve substantial reductions in emissions from the largest source in our city, our buildings, and keep New York City on-track toward our 80×50 target,” said Mayor de Blasio. “‎This sets the stage for even more dramatic reductions that will be achieved through mandatory retrofits for the largest, most polluting buildings across the five boroughs. When Trump pulled out of the Paris Agreement, we knew we had to accelerate our local climate actions, and that’s exactly what’s happening.‎”

The report was produced in partnership with Urban Green Council and NYU’s Center for Urban Science and Progress. It is part of a nearly decade long effort to better evaluate and manage energy use in buildings citywide, which contribute nearly 70 percent of the city’s greenhouse gas emissions. Seven years ago, as part of its efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions from buildings, the City of New York launched an initiative to determine how much energy its largest buildings use. Since then, Local Law 84 of 2009 (LL84) requires owners and managers of buildings that occupy at least 50,000 square feet to report the amount of energy and water these buildings use each year. This information can be used to compare the buildings’ energy performance against that of similar buildings. This process of reporting and comparison, known as benchmarking, has since been adopted by many major cities, including Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Chicago.

(…)

“This year’s report represents another significant step forward in using data analytics to address the serious urban challenge of climate change,” said Constantine E. Kontokosta, PhD, PE, Professor of Urban Informatics at NYU CUSP and Tandon, Director of NYU’s Urban Intelligence Lab, and lead data scientist for the report. “New York City continues to lead on climate action, and data-driven, evidenced-based policies are necessary to achieve the Mayor’s ambitious goals to reduce the City’s carbon emissions and energy use.”

Greenhouse gases cut by 14% under city buildings plan, report says

The city’s largest buildings reduced carbon emissions by 14 percent and energy use by 10 percent between 2010 and 2015, a new reportfound.

The “Greener, Greater Buildings Plan,” which recorded the energy and water use of 4,200 buildings in Manhattan, outlined the importance of ensuring energy efficiency in the city’s building sector, according to the report by the mayor’s office, the Urban Green Council and NYU’s Center for Urban Science and Progress.

“New Yorkers experienced the future of our climate with superstorm Sandy. And that’s one reason why everyone who lives here does their part where it counts most — in our buildings,” Russell Unger, executive director of the Urban Green Council, said in an emailed statement. “Our report shows the city has taken a real bite out of its carbon emissions, and also that we’ll need to move faster to achieve 80×50.”

Urban Impact Series: Gov. Martin O’Malley, MetroLab Network

NYC makes strides in reducing its greenhouse gas emissions

Although some would have the population believing otherwise, greenhouse gas emissions are a real issue. And while New York City, with its shipped-in food and barged-out trash, is no small contributor to that matter, the city is at least making strides to amend its contribution.

The mayor’s office, along with Urban Green Council and NYU’s Center for Urban Science and Progress, released a report today citing an eight percent decrease in greenhouse gas emissions from 3,000 of the city’s largest buildings between 2010 and 2013. In those same buildings, energy use decreased by six percent.

The initiative to decrease greenhouse gas emissions and energy use in buildings across the city is part of Mayor de Blasio’s OneNYC campaign, which seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in NYC by 80 percent from its 2005 levels by 2050.

Testimonial Interview – Kenneth Daly

Testimonial Interview – Frances Resheske

Pat Bowers

New Energy Data Is Changing How We Judge Efficiency—and LEED

Seeking Lessons from New York City Benchmarking Data, Researchers Question Everything We Thought We Knew About Energy Metrics

In the beginning, there was Energy Star.

Supported by the online Portfolio Manager infrastructure and statistical models from the periodic Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star has been the envy of the energy policy world; no other country has that kind of benchmarking tool. In fact, it was just licensed to Canada. (Energy Star for Homes and Energy Star labels for appliances and other equipment are mostly unrelated programs.)

Empirical State Building

A Distinguished Lecture and podcast from Dr Steven Koonin, Founding Director of CUSP, given at the University of Warwick, CUSP’s only European partner.

New York. Bright lights? Certainly. Big city? Unquestionably. Lab experiment?… In this Distinguished Lecture for the University of Warwick, Steven Koonin discusses his new role as the head of New York University’s new Center for Urban Science and Progress and how NYC is about to go ‘under the digital microscope’.